FAQs (Frequently Asked Questions)



BoyWhat does the acronymn CASA represent?
 
How is a CASA volunteer different from a social worker?
 
How is a CASA volunteer different from an attorney?
 
Is being a CASA volunteer the same as being a mentor?
 
Who do CASA volunteers serve and how are they appointed to cases?

I have a question about a specific case or CASA volunteer. Who do I contact?
 
What is the mission of Georgia CASA?
 
How do I become a volunteer with an affiliate CASA program?
 
What is Georgia CASA's contact information?
 
Which affiliate CASA program serves my community?
 
How do I find contact information for CASA programs outside of Georgia?
 
How can I donate to Georgia CASA or an affiliate CASA program?
 
How can I get electronic updates from Georgia CASA?
 
How can I start an affiliate CASA program in my community?
 
Where can I find an affiliate CASA program's statistical information?
 
Are there reference materials on the web site that CASA volunteers can use?
 
What are current employment opportunities with Georgia CASA and affiliate CASA programs?
   
Who is the Georgia CASA intranet for and how is it accessed?
 
I can't open some documents. Why is this?
 

What does the acronymn CASA represent?
CASA stands for Court Appointed Special Advocate. For more information, please click here.
 
How is a CASA volunteer different from a social worker?
Social workers are employed by the state and often assigned to many cases at a time. The social worker is responsible for helping an entire family, which includes setting up individual services for family members. A CASA volunteer is the advocate for the child, is not paid, works with only a few cases at a time and does not set up services. The CASA volunteer does not replace the social worker on a case; he or she is an independent officer of the court and works within the child welfare system to advocate forwhat is in the best interest of the children.
 
How is a CASA volunteer different from an attorney?
A CASA volunteer does not provide legal representation for a child in the courtroom; he or she does not replace an attorney. CASA volunteers operate as lay guardian ad litems (GALs). A GAL can be an attorney, a CASA volunteer, or both.
 
Is being a CASA volunteer the same as being a mentor?
CASA volunteers are only appointed to children who have come to the attention of the juvenile court system due to abuse or neglect.  Like a mentoring program, the CASA volunteer does develop a relationship with the child through frequent contact; however, the primary role of the CASA volunteer is to gather information about the child, write reports to the court and attend court hearings. The CASA program is not a mentoring program. There is also a policy to not transport children within all  affiliate CASA programs.
 
Who do CASA volunteers serve and how are they appointed to cases?
CASA volunteers serve children who have been removed from their homes as a result of abuse and/or neglect. They range in age from 0-17, come from all races and ethnicities and have one thing in common - they have been traumatized at the hands of those who were supposed to be their protectors. Once the children are taken into DFCS (Department of Family and Children Services) custody, their cases are overseen by judges in the juvenile courts who appoint CASA volunteers to provide recommendations about what is in the best interests of the children - now and for the future. 
I have a question about a specific case or CASA volunteer. Who do I contact?
For questions regarding a specific case the CASA organization is involved with or for questions about a specific CASA volunteer, please contact the appropriate affiliate CASA program.
What is the mission of Georgia CASA?
Georgia CASA develops affiliate CASA programs throughout the state and provides a wide array of support services to its affiliate CASA programs, including services in the areas of statistical reporting, staff trainings, volunteer recruitment and screening, volunteer training manuals, network communications and legislative advocacy. Georgia CASA is committed to maintaining a network of well-administered, affiliate programs that operate independently with mutual accountability, resulting in the highest level of advocacy for all of Georgia’s dependent children. Georgia CASA, and its affiliate CASA programs, are all members of the National CASA Association, a nationwide network of CASA state and local programs.
 
How do I become a volunteer with an affiliate CASA program?
Several steps are involved in becoming a CASA volunteer. You must complete an application, have an interview, pass a criminal background check and go through 40 hours of training. Upon completion of these steps and successfully passing the overall screening process, you will be sworn-in as a CASA volunteer. For more information, please click here. You can also complete the Volunteer Inquiry Form to be connected to an affiliate CASA program. There may also be other types of volunteer opportunities available at an affiliate CASA program. To inquire about those opportunities, please contact an affiliate CASA program.
 
What is Georgia CASA's contact information?
Georgia CASA's contact information is at the bottom of each web page and on the main Contact page. You can also contact individual staff members. You can also get travel directions to the Georgia CASA office.
 
Which affiliate CASA program serves my community?
To find out which affiliate CASA program serves your community, please check the program directory.
 
How do I find contact information for CASA programs outside of Georgia?
For contact information on all CASA programs in the United States, please click here.
 
How can I donate to Georgia CASA or an affiliate CASA program?
You can make a charitable donation to Georgia CASA, online by credit card or via mail by check or money order, by visiting the Donate page. To make a donation to an affiliate CASA program, please designate the affiliate CASA program on the donation form. If you have questions, please call us at 404.874.2888 or 1.800.251.4012. You can also donate directly to an affiliate CASA program by contacting the appropriate affiliate CASA program.
 
How can I get electronic updates from Georgia CASA?
You can get electronic updates from Georgia CASA in three ways: by signing up for Georgia CASA's e-newsletter, and other e-updates, on the Email Updates page, by joining Georgia CASA on Facebook and following Georgia CASA on Twitter.
 
How can I start an affiliate CASA program in my community?
If you are interested in starting an affiliate CASA program in your community, please view the Program Development page for more information.
 
Where can I find an affiliate CASA program's statistical information?
You can find quarterly and annual statistical information for each affiliate CASA program on the Program Statistics page.
 
Are there reference materials on the web site that CASA volunteers can use?
Georgia CASA's web site includes a page dedicated to current CASA volunteers. The Volunteer Reference page includes links to articles, state policy information, resources for children and services, training links and more.
 
What are current employment opportunities with Georgia CASA and affiliate CASA programs?
To view a listing of current job openings with Georgia CASA and affiliate CASA programs, please view the Employment page. Note that affiliate program job openings are listed at the request of the affiliate programs, and therefore the listing may not include all actual open positions.
 
Who is the Georgia CASA intranet for and how is it accessed?
The intranet is for affiliate CASA program directors and staff members. It includes resources and reference materials relating to every aspect of operating an affiliate CASA program. It can be accessed by clicking "Intranet" on the top right menu of any web page.
 
I can't open some documents. Why is this?
Most of the documents on this site are in Adobe Acrobat .pdf format. If you cannot open these files, please download Adobe Acrobat Reader. Other documents may be in Microsoft Word.